fbpx
  • Flashback Friday

    Living with BPD Story: Arpita’s Experience (In Their Words)

    living with bpd story bpd recovery, stock photo of a woman standing in the rain
    Stock Photo – not real representation

    Trigger Warning: verbal & physical abuse, self harm, suicide attempts, death by suicide, hospitalization. Read at your own discretion.

    The following post was written by Arpita

    My Living with BPD Story

    “Hello everyone. I am Arpita, a resident of Delhi, India. I will be telling you my living with bpd story today. I was born after 16 years since my parents got married. I had an elder sister and an elder brother. My brother went to United Stated when I was in kinder garden. I had witness a lot of verbal abuse in my childhood which was normal to me. Sometimes, even physical abuse.

    There was not a single day I did not see anyone fight at my house. I felt extremely lonely and stayed isolated because I was almost always scared of sharing anything with anyone as a child. After 5 years my brother came back to India. Unexpectedly, the fights increased. As I was very young when my brother and sister graduated, I could not figure out that the environment was toxic.

  • Top Picks

    75 Ideas for a DIY Depression Care Package

    75 ideas for a diy depression care package make a care package for a depressed friend

    Build a Care Package for Someone with Depression

    I’m Audrey Harper — the woman behind BPD Beautiful, a BPD recovery blog that aims to spread BPD awareness and assist others in understanding those living with BPD. This post features product ideas for a DIY depression care package for either your loved one with depression, a charity serving a depressed community or even for yourself.

    Since BPD Beautiful is a BPD recovery blog, of course I have to mention the correlation between depression and borderline personality disorder at least once in this post. Here are some statistics originally found on verywellmind

    BPD and depression commonly occur together. One study found that about 96% of patients with BPD met criteria for a mood disorder. In this study, about 83% of patients with BPD also met criteria for major depressive disorder, and about 39% of patients with BPD also met criteria for dysthymic disorder.  

  • Living With BPD

    Living with BPD: 1 Year vs. 3 Years of DBT for BPD Recovery

    living with bpd dbt for bpd bpd recovery bpd splitting bpd traits
    Photo by Finn on Unsplash

    From ‘Hopeless’ BPD Traits to BPD Recovery

    My name is Audrey and I have borderline personality disorder (BPD). I created this blog because I want to help spread BPD awareness and help others in understanding BPD—a debilitating, life threatening and highly stigmatized condition that causes frequent and intense mood swings, all or nothing thinking, a fear of abandonment, a chronic feeling of emptiness, explosive rage and more.

    The first section of the following post was started in 2020 just about one year after starting DBT. Present day takeaways written in 2022 are in the second section to show how three years of regular DBT practice can help someone living with BPD.

    Currently (in Sept 2022)—I am in remission and have went from having all 9 BPD symptoms to only having 2-3 BPD symptoms. This means I, at the time, do not meet diagnostic criteria. Borderline personality disorder is treatable. This post is proof of that. 

  • Living With BPD

    Borderline Personality Disorder and the Church: Christians with BPD

    borderline personality disorder and christianity christians with bpd bpd christian bpd and christianity
    Photo by Cosmic Timetraveler on Unsplash

    Trigger Warning:  Christianity in a favorable light, struggles with belief in God, fitting in at church, splitting, BPD symptoms. Read at your own discretion.

    This post was written by Brianna Rhodes

    You can’t understand me without understanding borderline personality disorder.

    I’m still wrestling with feeling like I don’t fit in and that I’m misunderstood. I don’t know anyone who can relate to me on the level I so deeply desire. I know of one other person with BPD, and they’re not even a Christian. I don’t know a single Christian with BPD. Imagine that for a second—countless individuals struggle with anxiety, depression, PTSD, and so on, but rarely are individuals diagnosed with BPD who still pursue the Lord.

    I crave a community that I’ll never have–one that truly understands and can relate to me. I have to mourn that. It’s like I have no one with whom I can process the intense feelings and emotions I experience. Yes, I have a counselor, but her role is to help me process my trauma. Obviously, that will help with these emotions/feelings over time, but my counselor can’t make BPD disappear. She can’t make the symptoms I battle daily disappear. She can’t relate to me and understand how much harder it is for someone with BPD to follow the Lord than for someone who doesn’t. I can’t even believe the nice things people say about me. Can you imagine how much harder it is to believe that a God I can’t see loves me and calls me His? It’s nearly impossible.