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  • Love Life

    35 Signs You’re in a Borderline and Narcissist Relationship

    couple fighting to show bpd and narcissist couple in a borderline and narcissist relationship

    Trigger Warning: Narcissistic abuse. “Borderline” and “Narcissist” are used as labels for simplicity & SEO purposes but these terms may feel shameful to some – we also can’t armchair diagnose others. Read at your own discretion.

    The following post was written by Jasper

    Are you living with BPD and in a difficult relationship with someone you think may be narcissistic? Perhaps they say hurtful things or make comments that make you feel like your feelings and opinions don’t matter. Or, maybe after spending time together, you often find yourself feeling drained or exhausted due to the constant drama and manipulation. If this sounds familiar, then it’s possible that your partner is narcissistic and you’re in a borderline and narcissist relationship.

    Being in any type of relationship with someone who has narcissistic traits or NPD can be incredibly challenging – but it’s especially hard if you have borderline personality disorder (BPD). In this blog post, we aim to provide clarity so that those in a potential borderline and narcissist relationship are better equipped to comprehend their dynamic more clearly.

    We’ll do that by going over 35 signs you can use to see if you may be in a borderline and narcissist relationship. But first, let’s cover some basics about the BPD and narcissist couple.

  • Dealing with BPD

    How to Make Plans Without Triggering Your Partner with BPD

    saying no to someone with borderline personality disorder living with someone with bpd bpd spouse (decorative image of house at night)
    Photo by Fabrice Villard on Unsplash

    A Common BPD Trigger Seen in Borderline Personality Disorder Relationships

    If you’re new here, I’m Audrey: a mom, wife and blogger formerly diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. My goal for this blog is to help raise BPD awareness, dispel common BPD myths and help other people with BPD and their BPD relationships. This post touches on a common BPD trigger and is written for both people with BPD and their partners. So you can easily share this post with your partner and go over it together.

    A trait of healthy relationships is spending time apart—either alone or with friends. However, going out without your BPD spouse or partner can be a huge trigger for some. Like saying no to someone with borderline personality disorder, leaving someone with BPD alone can lead to intense emotional responses or blow up fights. This isn’t because the person with BPD wants to be difficult. It’s because of their fear of abandonment.

    Even though I’ve been in therapy for over a decade and I, as of 2022, do not meet the criteria for a BPD diagnosis (after suffering with untreated BPD for 17 years), the trigger of having my husband make plans without me has only significantly improved in the last year. This was such a debilitating trigger for me for the longest time, with every single partner I had. Simply being aware of the trigger wasn’t enough to stop the feelings that ate at my core and it wasn’t enough to keep me from reacting.

    Something else had to be done.

  • Love Life

    The BPD and Narcissist Couple: What it Looks Like

    Photo by Alex Iby on Unsplash

    Trigger Warning: Narcissistic abuse, abuse from those with BPD traits. “Borderline” and “Narcissist” are used as a label for simplicity & SEO purposes (battlers are not defined by their diagnosis). Read at your own discretion.

    Why Borderlines & Narcissists Attract Each Other

    A big topic in the BPD community is the borderline and narcissist relationship. ‘Bpd and narcissist couple’ is searched on Google thousands of times a month. Ask any mental health professional knowledgeable about BPD and they’ll tell you that these two types of personality disorders tend to be attracted to each other. The borderline and narcissist relationship is prevalent and most likely, incredibly toxic and abusive.

    Inotherwords, it’s worth talking about. 

  • Other Relationships

    71 Jobs for People with BPD

    jobs for bpd borderline personality disorder work best jobs for someone with bpd
    Photo by Yasmina H on Unsplash

    Borderline Personality Disorder + Work

    Maintaining a job and having a stable career can be difficult for people with BPD. Because let’s just be honest, borderline personality disorder and work aren’t always the best fit for each other. At least that’s the case for a lot of people I’ve met online in the BPD community. And that’s why I’ve put together this list of jobs for BPD.

    I have borderline personality disorder too, so I can relate to the struggle of mixing bpd and work. Five years ago…before I was self employed and diagnosed, my bpd intensified feelings were hard to manage during the work day.